Project

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Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia: Colket Translational Research Building

Philadelphia, PA

Close Up

  • Architect

    Ballinger

  • Engineer

    LeMessurier

  • Façade Consultant

    Gordon H. Smith Corporation

  • GC

    Turner Construction Company

  • Completion

    2009

  • Building Type

    Healthcare
    Research

  • LEED Rating

    Silver certified

  • Program

    12 stories, 350,000 sqft

  • Façade Area

    Design/build custom unitized systems consisting of aluminum and glass, including terra cotta rain screens and aluminum components

  • Glass

    Standard 1 inch insulated, low e-coating

Materials

Systems

Processes

Detail

CHoP's latest state-of-the-art laboratory space hosts the Children’s Hospital’s Center for Childhood Cancer Research and Center for Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics, departments that turn pediatric science into medical innovation. The Colket Translational Research Building (CTRB) is the first of CHoP's south campus expansion. This $496 million research tower is comprised of four laboratory floors, a two-story ground floor lobby, cafeteria, conference space, and four administrative office floors. The building has been designed to anticipate future growth and expand an additional 27-stories.

Enclos provided a comprehensive design/build program for the building facade, which is comprised primarily of a custom unitized curtainwall system. The CTRB design program maximizes transparency, allowing seventy-five percent of the building's floor space to include natural daylighting and views to the exterior. The tower balances this transparency with energy savings by means of windows and roofing that retain heat in the winter and reflect it throughout the summer. This crucial facade design was a primary contributor to the project's LEED silver certification award from the USGBC.

CTRB's entranceway incorporates a single-story structural glass facade that again maximizes transparency and natural daylighting. The system includes a point-fixed vertical cable mullion wall that creates an openness to the corridor by tying into the building's doorframes.